October 4, 2021

Looking for ways to keep the conversation going about LGBTQ+ issues with your ERG, community group, or PFLAG chapter? Welcome to Something to Talk About, a series designed by PFLAG National’s Straight for Equality program to create conversation about LGBTQ+ issues. Each week we’ll offer an article on LGBTQ+ topics and suggest a few questions you can use to lead a discussion. 

We hosted a conversation about this article as a part of PFLAG Connects and Something to Talk About Live on Thursday, October 7. Did you miss it? You can still watch it here!

Have feedback about how your conversation went? Let us know by e-mailing [email protected]

Article: The LGBTQ+ History Exhibit That (Unfortunately) Made History 

Source:  Advocate 

Author: Rodney Wilson 

We're also very excited to welcome two notable guests to the show this week: 

Journalist and author Eric Marcus is the founder and host of the award-winning Making Gay History podcast, which mines his decades-old audio archive of rare interviews to bring LGBTQ history to life through the voices of the people who lived it. Dr. Eric Cervini is an award-winning historian of LGBTQ+ politics, a NYT bestselling author, and a Pulitzer Prize finalist for his first book, THE DEVIANT’S WAR: The Homosexual vs. the United States of America

Questions for Discussion:

  1. What happened in Missouri is not isolated. Recently, Tennessee passed a bill allowing parents to remove children from any class that addresses LGBTQ+ issues or history. Do you think it’s more controversial than ever to talk about LGBTQ+ history?

  2. What’s lost when LGBTQ+ figures are erased from history? Can you provide examples of events or individuals where the erasure of their LGBTQ+ identity has left learners with incomplete stories?

  3. Often, much of LGBTQ+ U.S. history starts with Stonewall, even though much activism came before it. Can you identify some of the events and individuals who predated Stonewall and why they’re significant?

  4. LGBTQ+ history has often defaulted to center on the contributions of white gay men, although this is starting to change. Can you identify some of the figures (e.g., who are BiPOC, allies, bi+, transgender, etc.) who people should learn about during this LGBTQ+ History Month? 

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